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Bullish Visions

BUCKING HISTORY The Bulls by Erica Neumann
This series of six bucking bull oil paintings is more than abstract representations of raging bovines.

This is the culmination of over five years work on a theory that exposeses the mysteries of ancient art by connecting them to modern art through a shared human trait.

In understanding the trait and what it does to our perception, we can fully understand the mysteries of how cave drawings can be so complex, and why spirits so often appear in ancient works. The Bull paintings are modern examples of art using this shared trait during their creation.

SEEING IN CLOUDS We all know of this trait as it causes us to sometimes see shapes and figures in clouds or mountain contours, such as the sleeping buffalo mountain in Banff. These types of visions might appear to us on other textured surfaces, such as granite, marble, and woodgrain. I call these surfaces triggers, and the trait is referred to as Pareidolia.

PAREIDOLIA AND ART My idea explaining ho…
Recent posts

Painting Peace Park 2018

THE ADVENTURE BEGINS In the late spring of 2017 the invitation to participate in this one of a kind exhibition arrived. We were to paint both sides of the Peace Park - Waterton in Canada and Glacier National in America. In August 2018, the American and Canadian artists would exhibit the results at the Hockaday Museum, in Kalispell, Montana.

A year long good-kind-of-panic began.

WATERTON Beauvais Provincial Park is a favourite place to camp.

The cat loves it too.

Nan, Pop, Gary, Miss P, myself and the dog piled into the car for a day trip from Beauvais to Waterton, near the end of May.

 In Waterton, on the way up to Cameron Lake, the trees were gorgeous in the bright light.

Photographed from inside the moving car, little did we know that for us, these would be the last glimpses of this forest...
...before it burned in the devastating fires a few weeks later. As painful as it is to look at these photos, we are all grateful to have experienced their beauty first hand.
Once at the top, th…

Painters Matching Their Paintings II

The Artist as Chameleon
It is said that artists are a mirror to society, creating work that reflects the times. To challenge that notion are these photos, evidence that artists are less reflective and more camouflage. Chameleon, they blend in with their work. Like the chameleon in the wild, they are difficult to spot in their natural environment, and share similar characteristics, such as a peaceful, gentle disposition and a habit of grasping sticks all day long.

Instinct
After an extensive study, spanning a half decade, it's been determined that theses particular artists are behaving instinctively, and do not wake up in the morning intending to find the outfit that best blends with their art. They usually grab any old thing because they knew it may end up covered in pigment, and respond in a surprised manner when their behaviour is pointed out to them.

Canadian These particular artists can be found in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains, in and near Calgary, Alberta. It remains t…